The learning objectives follow four main learning effects of serious games in teaching innovation sciences as proposed by Bogers & Sproedt (2012) in their article “Playful Collaboration (or Not): Using a Game to Grasp the Social Dynamics of Open Innovation in Innovation and Business Education”:

  • Enable critical reflection on social dynamics and experience-based learning – applying the learning of reflections and experience through iteration. Teams have to show their ability on this aspect by a continuous approach on playing the game and a growing amount of awareness of the gameplay and progress based on results and reflections.
  • The game enables to students to create a more holistic understanding of complex social dynamics when dealing with novelty. Teams have to show their ability on this aspect by preferring a long-term oriented focus and a strategic perspective on running an innovative organization over a short-term oriented focus with a focus on operational results.
  • A deeper understanding of innovation sciences. Teams have to show their ability on this aspect by taking “wise” decisions in the game. Wise decisions match criteria such as: effectiveness within the changing context of the simulation, efficiency based on the return on investment (in time, quality and money), coherency between different decisions taken and coherence over the years.
  • Creating a shared experience of social dynamics and the paradox of co-opetition for the students. Teams have to show their ability on this aspect by an indication of strategic focus over the years and a certain amount of logic correlation between the decisions taken in different years. Effective teams collaborate in order to take well-thought decisions. Less effective teams often don’t talk about long-term strategies and don’t support each other on taking smart decisions. This will be reflected by a lack of strategic focus in the game.